5E bottom half vs complete 5E

Discussion in 'ENGINE' started by Nich, Dec 23, 2018.

  1. Nich

    Nich Fresh Recruit

    Hey guys. I've had my Starlet about 3 months now. I recently upgraded to a tdo4. I got a chinese GT30 with the car and I want to put it to use. However I feel it will have too much lag on a 4e engine so I need help in deciding wether or not to get an entire 5e engine or just the bottom half. I'm still in school so my budget is tight.

    What are the advantages and disadvantages of both cases?

    Also take it easy on me. It's my first car so I'm new to the modifying world :oops:
     
  2. Calum122

    Calum122 Registered User +

    There are other ways to reduce the boost threshold on a 4E engine without the expense of a 5e. I take it you got a 4efte engine? As the 5e engines are N/A, you would really want to uprate components to make it handle the bigger turbo. So in otherwords, if you're on a budget, it might make more sense to stick with the current engine and think of other ways to lower that boost threshold
     
  3. Jay

    Jay Admin

    Hi bud, when the rest of the world build a 5EFE to turbo we normally use the head of the 4EFTE and the bottom end of the 5EFE with 4EFTE pistons.

    This gives the extra cc of the 5E with pistons designed to handle boosted life coupled with a cylinder head with stronger valve springs that can take the abuse too.

    That being said I notice you are from Jamaica and your fore-runners were boosting standard 5E's straight off the cuff. There were tales of using multiple headgaskets to bring compression down and mental boost levels being used back in the day but how much was true is anyone's guess. You could ask about local as it was a much travelled path in that part of the globe.
     
    Nich likes this.
  4. SKINY

    SKINY Registered User +

    any more information on your Chinese turbo ? I've only had one experience with a Chinese turbo and it ended badly
     
  5. Nich

    Nich Fresh Recruit

    Hey. To be honest all I know it's pretty huge. A 68 back housing and I got it with a ram horn manifold. The blades are in pretty good shape and the cold side is clean as hell. I'll try to upload pics ASAP
     
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  6. thefalls

    thefalls Registered User +

    And if i remember well then some of them would shave the stock 5efe pistons also to lower compression ratio.
    Their build of 5E 300whp has upset quite a few people over here who have gone forged 4E too. LOL!
    It was good banter back in the days. :)
     
    Jay likes this.
  7. Jay

    Jay Admin

    Aka the good old days - when halfar was downhill lol
     
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  8. 5e colin

    5e colin Registered User +

    welcome back kid

    4efte and 5efe head is the same only the valve springs differ

    you need to forge that bottom end to run the chinky turbo anyways to make it come alive up booooost

    10/12 psi on 5efe rods is pushing it
     
  9. suzieboy

    suzieboy Fresh Recruit

    The rods could actually take 10-12 psi (even more). Its the pistons that are the weak point. Those ringlands cant really take abuse from experience.
     
    Jay likes this.
  10. wickedep

    wickedep Registered Trader

    yeap..this is correct..
     
  11. Skalabala

    Skalabala Registered User +

    Saying a 4EFTE head and 5EFE head is the same is wrong. There were different combustion chambers for different markets etc.
    And stock pistons are not the weak link. The method of fuel and timing calculations and the tuner is the problem. Stock pistons can take 1.6bar of boost.
     
  12. Calum122

    Calum122 Registered User +

    You're not wrong, but it is known for the ringlands to crack which is their weak points.

    I joke with my friends, having had a forged car for a long time, they finally caught up forging their engines, I joke by saying, "These days it's all about going Cast. It's not the tune, it's the tuner" haha.

    You're not wrong, but there is a limit to what these engines can take, better to uprate and play it safe, than to get it wrong and pay the price. Decent tuners are hard to come by.
     

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