Camlifter seems to have damage along the edges

Jay

Admin
I'd say that the vast majority of lobe issues I've seen have been on the edges like yours.

Only one springs to mind that wasn't and it's from a Glanza 4EFTE that blew up on track about three years back.

On engine strip down I found heavily carbon build up in the ringlands which had gummed up the piston rings. Subsequent oil in the compression chambers coupled with a bit too much boost, lazy tune and hard driving led to detonation. Four pistons cracked as a result so the damage on the cam was the least of this engines problems. Amazingly it did drive home lol.

The gummed up ringlands is a common issue on the 4E, a topic for a different thread I reckon.
 

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Skalabala

Member +
Looking at the OP photos it looks like the valve clearances are all over the place.
The damage looks to me like a hardness issue. Or the more likely one, someone was in there with a pry bar trying to do valve seals or valve lash on the ghetto!
 

RoyalDutchie

Member +
I'll (finally) check the valve clearance soon, I guess within a month and post the results.

@Jay Checking the journals should be done journal by journal I guess? I do not have an open ended torque wrench yet so can't really retorque the bolts with the threaded parts sticking out. Guess the few I can check should tell the story for the others aswell too some degree?

Would regular oil changes, every 5-6months or 3k kms decrease the amount of carbon inside the engine? Or does it need to be flushed to even be able to get the buildup out of it.
 

Jay

Admin
Deep socket would let you torque them. Just on that, I wouldn't use a 12 pointed socket with them, would suggest you have a good six point instead. Will save any rounding issues.

I'll grab a few shots of the 5e guidelines in the manual. Toyota specify a special tool but you would be removing and reinstalling the shafts which is a pain.
 

Jay

Admin
And yes, in my experience anyway a well serviced engine shouldn't suffer the same carbon build up. Often overlooked if you aren't doing the mileage but time is a big factor here too. At least once a year would be recommended whether you are doing 5000 km or just 5.

A flush helped the 1mzfe in my old jeep (that engine is notorious for it) so if you aren't happy with what you are seeing it could save a lot of engine work. Think I've only used Wynns myself.
 

RoyalDutchie

Member +
Deep socket would let you torque them. Just on that, I wouldn't use a 12 pointed socket with them, would suggest you have a good six point instead. Will save any rounding issues.

I'll grab a few shots of the 5e guidelines in the manual. Toyota specify a special tool but you would be removing and reinstalling the shafts which is a pain.
Thanks jay, I think I only have 6 point sockets so should be fine. Only want to check the journals for scouring and clean up the caps so shouldn't be much of a pain yet before changing the cams really starts.

I'll clean the journal caps one by one and put some assembly lube on the journal face and retorque the bolts, should be fine I suppose?

Will be checking the clearance and reshim them if needed. Will post my findings and pics of the journals once I have them.

And yes, in my experience anyway a well serviced engine shouldn't suffer the same carbon build up. Often overlooked if you aren't doing the mileage but time is a big factor here too. At least once a year would be recommended whether you are doing 5000 km or just 5.

A flush helped the 1mzfe in my old jeep (that engine is notorious for it) so if you aren't happy with what you are seeing it could save a lot of engine work. Think I've only used Wynns myself.

Can get Wynns here, only thing that bothers me is the possibility of more extreme leaks. The engine currently seems to leak oil from the oil pan(will reseal soon) and the distributor oil ring. both crankshaft seals have been replaced now. I guess cleaning is the best after the leaks have been resolved. Than check again once the engine has been flushed.
 

Jay

Admin
From the 4E's I've looked at with carboned up piston rings there's no magic fix - they need removed and cleaned up manually or replaced.
 
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